Salsa Blog

Lots of good stuff rolling out at Salsa - let’s catch you up to date

by Jake Patoski, Training & Online Learning Manager, Salsa

Automatic Word code detection and removal

Because we’ll catch you if you fall, we’ll be the wind beneath your wings.

What’s different: Salsa used to tell you (ad nauseum) not to copy Microsoft Word content over into your email blasts because it adds bad code that may change the way your email blast actually looks, or will cause your emails to be spurned by spam filters. Well now, you can copy over from Microsoft Word and Salsa will clean out that proprietary code automatically.

How it affects you: It should improve your workflow as you can now draft in Word and copy straight over, without a need for an intermediate step in NotePad/TextEdit or an HTML editor. Otherwise, you don’t need to enable this feature or do anything different - just cut/copy and paste.

What to watch out for: Word documents with very heavy formatting may not port over completely correctly. What Salsa does to Word content is along the lines of “stripping out” rather than “converting over” - so some of Word’s more proprietary design elements may not make it through.

Undelete your supporters

Because sometimes you really did just accidentally delete 3,284 supporters.

What’s different: Previously, Salsa would give you only one second-chance before you deleted a supporter, along the lines of this:

Now, using the Query tool, you can find and restore all of your deleted supporters, or just a queried subsection of your supporters.

How it affects you: When you’re deleting a supporter, nothing is changed. However, behind the scenes the supporter is kept in a deleted purgatory, of sorts. When you navigate to the Query tool, you’ll now see an option above the query’s Save and Run button, Query Deleted Supporters.

Checking this option means your query conditions above will only be applied to the group of deleted supporters, not your active, “live” supporters.

After your query has run, you’ll see how many supporters met your conditions, and then you have one big option: Restore these supporters.

Click it, and you have now raised the dead. Your restored supporters will all retain their previous history and data.

What to watch out for: This feature does not apply to past deleted records. Only supporters deleted from this day onward will be included in this undelete feature. Restored supporters will carry over their previous settings - i.e. a subscribed supporter will be restored as a subscribed supporter, an unsubscribed supporter will be restored as still unsubscribed. Additionally, a deleted supporter who takes action in your Salsa account - signs up again, donates, signs a petition, etc. - will not automatically be restored.

Automatic tagging of all records in an import

Because sometimes you need a reminder of where that super activist got her humble beginnings (or just need to be able to fix that import that just screwed up).

What’s different: A tag that identifies the type of update and import key number will be automatically added to all supporters (both existing and new). Previously, you could only find the source details for a supporter (but not subsequent updates from other imports), and unless you remembered to put your imported supporters in a group, you wouldn’t be able to tell which existing supporters were updated through the import.

How it affects you: Navigate to a supporter record after an import, and you’ll see one of two tags formed like this: updated:import<Import key number> or created:import<import key number>. For example created:import41113 or updated:import15078.

What to watch out for: Just don’t get mixed up by created:import#### instead of updated:import####! If you're not familiar with the tag system yet, you may want to experiment a little so you get accustomed to seeing where the new tags will show up on your supporters' records and how to interact with them.

Topics: Supporter Management Salsa